Posts from the ‘Nature Art’ category

Animalia Art Show in Healdsburg Featured

If you are inspired by animals and their beauty, you should visit the “Animalia” exhibit at The Healdsburg Center for the Arts. It opens on Saturday, March 2 and runs through April 14. My bison photograph “Endurance” is a part of the show.

Exhibition Dates
March 2 – April 14, 2019 
Opening Reception
Saturday, March 2, 5:00 to 7:00 PM – , join us for this free reception honoring the artists. Wine and light refreshments will be available

Closing Tea
Sunday, April 14, 2:00 to 4:00 PM
Opportunity for public and artists alike to discuss animals and art techniques.


You’ll find more details on their web site:
https://healdsburgcenterforthearts.org/animalia/

Come Snap! up Art. January 18, Arc Gallery Featured

2016-winter-yellowstone-167

Endurance

Come celebrate the New Year with me at the Snap! 2019 art opening on Friday, January 18 at the Arc Gallery and Studios in SOMA.

You’ll find a gallery filled with bright artwork hung salon-style and ready to be snapped up. Pick your favorite piece and take it home. All works are $199. The show is up for just one night.

“Endurance,” my photograph of bison in a Yellowstone winter landscape, will be for sale. It’s beautifully printed on Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Metallic paper, and featured in a bold black frame.

For more information, see their web site:
https://www.arc-sf.com/snap-2019.html

“Eye of the Beholder” Show at SFWA Gallery Featured

My photograph of the California Scrub Jay watching the sunset from a tree in the botanical garden is in the February show at the SF Women Artists Gallery.

To see a collection of curated work, join us at the festive opening Reception of “Eye of the Beholder”. Meet the Artists, enjoy refreshments and music. 💫

The show runs through March 3.

When: Thursday, February 8, 5:30-8:00
Where: 647 Irving Street at 8th Avenue
San Francisco, CA

 

Ray Bandar and His Palace of Bones Featured

“Ray Bandar and His Palace of Bones” is a 49-page photography book that features Bandar’s skull collection along with stories about him and his favorite specimens. The book captures the importance of Bandar’s accomplishments while paying tribute to the grand complexity of the natural world.

For more information or questions about ordering this book, please fill out the form below and I will get back to you immediately. Thank you for you interest.

 

 

 

Vaux Swifts in San Rafael

Keeping an Eye Out for Birds Featured

This time of the year, California is a stop-over point for birds heading down to their wintering range. Watching birds fly in groups over the ocean or land is a spectacle of beauty that I seek out each year.

This past weekend, I headed over to a brickyard in San Rafael, where Vaux Swifts stop off for a couple of nights on their way down to Central America. Below is some video footage that I captured from that day, with some birders at the site calculating that there were more than 20,000 swifts trying to get into one brick chimney. We waited until dark, and there were still thousands of birds milling around.

Rumors were that the chimney was filled to capacity and that this was the largest congregation of birds they had ever seen at this site.

By 8pm, the wind had picked up so we left the birds, flying around like an insect swarm in hopes that some space at the chimney would open up.

Faux Swifts in San Rafael, September 12, 2015 (30 seconds) (Watch fullscreen in HD for full effect): 

Faux Swifts in San Rafael, September 12, 2015 (1 minute 10 seconds) (Watch fullscreen in HD for full effect)

What the negative tide revealed Featured

There are secret beaches and caves that appear out at Point Reyes when there is a negative tide, which is when the water is below the usual tide line. In May, a small group met at 6:30am to trek the 9 miles out to the secret beaches and caves in a secret location at Point Reyes. Along the way, we saw tidal pools filled with thousands of sea urchins and underwater terrain that isn’t usually visible. Rocks and secret caves appear on the beaches, which are also not usually available. That day we were lucky enough to see 13 grey whales heading north. I believe there is no place quite as beautiful as Northern California in the spring.

Algae, vellela and feather

Beach Beauties of Summer Featured

Ocean Beach offered up all sorts of uncommon visual marvels this past Tuesday, including Vellela (commonly known as by-the-wind sailor), different types of algae, and remnants of all sorts of hard-shelled creatures.

Nature created the compositions the way that I’ve captured them here. I haven’t styled any of these photos. I invite you to enjoy the beach’s beauty.

 

Ray's early apartment

Bandar’s Bones Return Featured

On Thursday, May 16, the Skulls exhibit will open at the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. The exhibit features a collection of skulls that will provide a fascinating look into nature’s engineering while telling us all about the lifestyle of many animals.

Perhaps as fascinating (if not more) is the story of the man who collected the majority of the skulls in this exhibit. At 86 years old, Ray Bandar has been collecting skulls for Cal Academy for more than 60 years. Many of the skulls he collected (approximately 7,000) are in his house in what he calls his Skull Palace, a basement room stacked high with bones and skulls. The exhibit will have a selection of those skulls along with hands-on activities for all ages.

My favorite part of the exhibit features a wall of sea lion skulls. The diversity of those skulls is remarkable as it tells the story of individual variation in one species. In front of that wall of sea lions is a video featuring Ray Bandar, much of it from my movie, Ray Bandar: A Life with Skulls, which I began back in 2003 when I first met Ray.

The inspiration for the movie occurred when I was on a backstage tour of the last Skulls exhibit at Cal Academy. During my tour, Ray told his bounty of tales with a boyish exuberance that I felt I needed to capture on video. He brought every skull to life with a tale: mammals dying because their horns locked when they were fighting, marine mammals with shotguns shells in their heads, how dogs represented man-made evolution and bears that had become obese on human food.

In search for a complete story about Ray’s passion, I interviewed his friends, colleagues and wife and followed him out on an excursion to collect the skull of a harbor porpoise. My own three-year journey with Ray would eventually turn into a 30-minute movie called Ray Bandar: A Life with Skulls, which was shown on PBS. You can buy the movie (with an hour of extras), from Amazon.com.

For more information see:
The California Academy of Sciences web site
KQED’s story on Ray Bandar